The Blog

Are you aware of the IR35 changes?

On 6 April the rules for IR35 changed and with the threat of a hefty fine should you get it wrong, it is almost certainly a good thing to make yourself aware of these changes.

What is IR35?

Before the IR35 legislation came into effect in 2000 there were an increasing number of people working through their own limited company. As a director of their company, they would enjoy perks that people in full-time employment would not be eligible for. The main reason for doing this was that no National Insurance Contributions (NICs) are payable on company dividends. Whereas, full-time staff has to pay PAYE and NICs.

The government believed that they were losing a lot of revenue through this system so introduced IR35. It was introduced to tackle cases of disguised employment. If anyone was caught foul of this they would be liable to pay the PAYE and NICs on their income.

What are the changes?

Up until now, it has been the responsibility of the worker to ensure that they were compliant. The change will only apply to work that is carried out within the public sector. The new rule will see the responsibility shift to the public sector client to determine whether their workers fall under IR35 or not. Failure to comply will result in hefty fines.

Will this affect me?

HMRC has created an IR35 Employment status tool that was launched last month (March 2017) to help workers, clients and agents identify if someone will be caught out by IR35. With mixed reports of accuracy on results, HMRC has said it will stand by the results of the tool assuming that all inputted data is correct.

What can I do?

If you think that this change may or may not affect you please get in touch with your accountant as soon as possible. Here at Ormerod Rutter, we have experts with years of experience in the industry. We also offer tax investigation insurance which covers any costs incurred should you have a tax investigation.

Have a question about IR35? Leave a question or comment below and we can offer you expert advice.

At Ormerod Rutter we understand that finances and tax can sometimes be confusing. We have 15 expert partners to hand that can offer expert advice on all financial matters, no matter how big or small. We pride ourselves on having big firm capabilities and family firm personality. Have a question or want to discuss your personal or business finances? Give us a call on 01905 777600.

* Please note that all information contained in this article is for informative purposes only and that we cannot be responsible for any errors or omissions.*

 

Spring Budget 2017: how will the announcements affect you?

Following the UK’s historic vote to leave the EU, and with Prime Minister Theresa May poised to trigger Article 50, Chancellor Philip Hammond presented the Spring Budget against a backdrop of economic uncertainty. Figures from the Office for Budget Responsibility revealed that UK economic growth is now expected to reach 2% this year, before falling to 1.6% in 2018.

The Chancellor announced a range of significant measures for businesses and individuals, including a support package for firms in England affected by the business rates revaluation and the announcement that unincorporated businesses and landlords with turnover below the VAT registration threshold will have until 2019 to prepare for quarterly reporting.

Also unveiled in the 2017 Spring Budget was an increase in the main rate of Class 4 national insurance contributions (NICs) to 10% in April 2018 and a reduction in the tax-free dividend allowance, which will fall from £5,000 to £2,000 in April 2018.

Our Budget Report provides an overview of the key announcements arising from the Chancellor’s speech. However, it also looks beyond the more sensational measures and offers detail on the less-publicised changes that are most likely to have an impact upon your business and your personal finances.

Additionally, throughout the Report you will find handy tips and ideas for practical tax and financial planning, as well as an informative 2017/18 Tax Calendar.

Don’t forget, we can help to ensure that your accounts are accurate and fully compliant, as well as suggest strategies to minimise your tax liability and maximise your profitability.

Click the link to download the Spring Budget 2017 Summary.

Have a question on the Spring Budget 2017? Leave a question or comment below and we can offer you expert advice.

At Ormerod Rutter we understand that finances and tax can sometimes be confusing. We have 15 expert partners to hand that can offer expert advice on all financial matters, no matter how big or small. We pride ourselves on having big firm capabilities and family firm personality. Have a question or want to discuss your personal or business finances? Give us a call on 01905 777600.

* Please note that all information contained in this article is for informative purposes only and that we cannot be responsible for any errors or omissions.*

*Since the Budget the government has now made a U-turn and will not be increasing the National Insurance Contributions from the self-employed. This was overturned as it went against one of the main Conservative manifestoes promises of not raising taxes. 

Payments On Account: Everything you need to know

What are Payments on Account?

Payments on Account are a method of paying towards future self-assessment tax bills. They are payable twice a year and each payment is normally 50% of the previous year’s tax liability.

Payments on Account are payable by midnight on 31 January and 31 July.

How does it work?

The first instalment is due on the 31 January. This amount will be 50% of your previous tax year’s tax liability. This is the same day that a balancing payment must be settled for the previous tax year.

The remaining 50% will be due by 31 July.  This enables your tax liability to be spread out throughout the year.

How about an example?

You owe £4,000 on earnings between 6 April 2015 and 5 April 2016 (excluding Class 2 National Insurance).

This amount will need to be settled by 31 January 2017. On top of this, a payment of £2,000 will need to be paid at the same time and again on 31 July 2017.

This means that when you file your self-assessment tax return for 2017 you will have already paid £4,000 towards it.

If you have overpaid, you will be due a refund. If you have underpaid, this difference will need to be settled by 31 January 2018.

Are Payments on Account voluntary?

If the tax bill from the previous year was over £1,000 then Payments on Account are required. However, if more than 80% of that year’s tax liabilities have been paid at source (e.g. through PAYE) Payments on Account are not required.

Can Payments on Account be reduced?

It is not unusual for earning’s to fluctuate year to year. If this is the case and earnings are forecast to be lower for the next financial year; an application can be made to reduce the Payments on Account via HMRC.

It is worth noting that if earnings remain the same and do not decrease after you have reduced the Payments on Account, that the difference will need to be settled by the preceding January plus any interest accrued.

Have a question on Payment on Account? Leave a question or comment below and we can offer you expert advice.

At Ormerod Rutter we understand that finances and tax can sometimes be confusing. We have 15 expert partners to hand that can offer expert advice on all financial matters, no matter how big or small. We pride ourselves on having big firm capabilities and family firm personality. Have a question or want to discuss your personal or business finances? Give us a call on 01905 777600.

* Please note that all information contained in this article is for informative purposes only and that we cannot be responsible for any errors or omissions.*

Making Tax Digital Update

The UK government’s response to the Making Tax Digital consultations has finally been published and has broadly been welcomed by business leaders and the tax profession.

With the exception of a very few, it is expected that all businesses will be required to hold their accounting records digitally and submit quarterly updates to HMRC. In addition to this, an end-of-year reconciliation will be required to ensure all financial activities have been recorded.

Criticisms of the report have focused on the short timeline for further consultations for the legislation and also the cost of transition during the first year.

The government will continue to consider issues contained in the report, such as the exemption threshold, so the features in the report are not a finalised list of changes.

Here is a list of some of the proposed decisions for Making Tax Digital:

  • Businesses will be able to continue to use spreadsheets for record-keeping, but they must ensure that their spreadsheet meets the necessary requirements of Making Tax Digital for Business – this is likely to involve combining the spreadsheet with software
  • Businesses eligible to use ‘three line accounts’ will be able to submit a quarterly update with only three lines of data (income, expenses and profit)
  • Free software will be available to businesses with the most straightforward affairs
  • The requirement to keep digital records does not mean that businesses have to make and store invoices and receipts digitally
  • Activity at the end of the year must be concluded and sent either by 10 months after the last day of the period of account or 31 January, whichever is sooner
  • Charities (but not their trading subsidiaries) will not need to keep digital records
  • For partnerships with a turnover above £10 million, Making Tax Digital for Business is deferred until 2020

You can view the full report here

Due to the overwhelming response to the initial consultations, the government is taking more time to consider issues raised alongside fiscal impacts.

Have a question on Making Tax Digital? Leave a question or comment below and we can offer you expert advice.

At Ormerod Rutter we understand that finances and taxes can sometimes be confusing. We have 15 expert partners to hand that can offer expert advice on all financial. We pride ourselves on having big firm capabilities and a family firm personality. Have a question or want to discuss your personal or business finances? Give us a call on 01905 777600.

* Please note that all information contained in this article is for informative purposes only and that we cannot be responsible for any errors or omissions from use of this information.*

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